This post first appeared on Edutopia.

Regularly, teachers tell me that they don’t feel as though they have time for project-based learning (PBL). While they like the idea in theory, they can’t see a way to realistically “fit it in” with their curriculum given constraints of time, testing, standards, etc. A regular response to the concept of PBL is: “It sounds great, but. . . ” Too often, they see it as a manufactured experience that results in the construction of a massive project and requires enormous amounts of class time. However, I believe that this is often because the emphasis is on the final product rather than the instructional strategy.

The true focus of PBL is encouraging students to engage in inquiry, explore real-world contexts, and share their learning with others. In the examples below, every teacher achieves these goals while still meeting curriculum requirements and without sacrificing an abundance of class time. While PBL may seem daunting, these teachers prove that it is more attainable and manageable than initially perceived.

>> Read the case studies on Edutopia.

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