Assessment

Resources


“How do I grade it?”

Assessing Student Learning

Teachers who integrate technology into student activities and projects often ask us this question - “How do I grade it?”Fundamentally, assessing multimedia activities and projects is no different than evaluating traditional assignments, such as written essays. The primary distinctions between them are the unique features and divergent possibilities associated with their respective medium. For instance, a blog has a unique set of possibilities (such as hypertext, embedded video, interactive imagery, etc) vastly different than those of a notebook (paper and pen notes and drawings within a contained document).


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Asessment Workshops

Designing Assessment for Remote Learning Environments

Designing Assessment for Remote Learning EnvironmentsWebinar: Designing Assessment for Remote Learning EnvironmentsApril 14th1:00PM - 2:00PM EST Designed for classroom teachers, curriculum specialists, and edtech staff, this webinar focuses on developing innovative formative assessment strategies for a remote learning instructional environment. Webinar participants will be prompted to rethink their balance of formative and summative assessment, reflect […]

Designing Assessments for Digital Experiences (SOLD OUT)

Join Tom Daccord for a One-week Virtual Summer Workshop starting on July 13, 2020.

Designing Assessments for Digital Experiences (SOLD OUT) Another session is added at 10AM

Join Tom Daccord for a One-week Virtual Summer Workshop starting on July 20, 2020.

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Assessment Blogs

Making Thinking Visible through Screencasting

The following post is an excerpt from EdTechTeacher CEO Tom Daccord's blog, Leading Innovations in Schools: From Someday to Monday.

Podcast: Redefining Assessment in an Age of Remote Learning

In this podcast episode, Tom Daccord and Caitlin McLemore discuss how assessment and grading are being redefined in an age of remote learning. Tom and Caitlin reconsider the balance of formative and summative assessment, reflect on the qualities of effective formative assessment, and explore several tools that can be used to create effective assessment strategies.

From Formal to Formative Assessment

The following post is an excerpt from EdTechTeacher CEO Tom Daccord's blog, Leading Innovations in Schools: From Someday to Monday.

Breaking from Tradition: Assessment During Remote Learning

The following post is an excerpt from EdTechTeacher CEO Tom Daccord's blog, Leading Innovations in Schools: From Someday to Monday.

The first thing to realize is that you cannot separate the user from the device. iPads, Chromebooks, and tech tools themselves don’t demonstrate great learning; it’s about what students do with the technology that matters. The technology itself is simply neutral. Consider: would a teacher grade the pen a student used to write an essay? Of course not! They grade what the student writes. It’s what students create with the tool that is at the heart of learning and assessment.Formative vs. Summative AssessmentPerformance is most often analyzed through formative and summative assessment. Formative assessment is ongoing and provides information needed to adjust teaching and learning for a more effective outcome. It not only helps to monitor student progress throughout an activity, but can also gauge student understanding and readiness to proceed to further tasks. Alternately, summative assessment focuses on a particular point in time, such as a test at the end of a unit or grading term.Regardless, whether the immediate assessment is formative or summative, a teacher needs to be able to distinguish between the capabilities of the tool and the students’ performance using it. To illustrate, anyone can easily produce a visually stunning and captivating video presentation using iMovie as it has built-in easy-to-use professional effects. Therefore, to assess a movie presentation effectively, the teacher needs evidence of the thinking that went into the creation of the movie. Rather than grade the end product, educators must focus on the process -- research, writing, image selection, etc.

This allows teachers to focus on learning throughout the whole project rather than the flashy, finished product.

Rubrics to Measure Student Learning

Providing detailed explanations of an assignment using an online rubric, created with tools such as Rubistar or Digital Media Scoring Guides, can assist students in both completing tasks and thinking about their performance. Additionally, these tools allow teachers to create rubrics for assessment quickly with a greater level of meaningful feedback. They can also easily be shared among teachers and saved or modified for future assignments.

Rubric Resources